Malware called Mirai

The Twitter account uses data compiled by researchers known as MalwareTech and 2sec4u, who have been mapping the spread of the malware ever since it was found responsible for a record-breaking DDoS attack against the website of cybersecurity reporter Brian Krebs. Following that attack, a hacker named Anna-senpai released the malware source code for free through a criminal hacking forum, presumably to cover their tracks as the attacks began making headlines. The malware is designed to scan for security cameras and other internet-connected “smart” devices that are still using their default passwords.
It’s still unclear who is behind the attacks, and several distinct Mirai botnets have emerged since the malware’s release. According to the researchers, the botnets have even been observed attacking one another, in some kind of bizarre cyber-dystopian turf war.

In any case, it’s probably a good idea to change the passwords on all your Internet of Things devices—or preferably keep them offline altogether.

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iOS 10 Maps

It looks like you will be able to find your parked vehicle now

If you are connected to Bluetooth on your automobile and have Maps running in background when you loose your Bluetooth connection it places a Red marker in Maps and that is where you parked.

You could also mark your current location if you do not have a Bluetooth Automobile.

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Roy Frost

text instead of iMessage 

Loads of people have much larger texting service than Data and iMessage uses WiFi first then Data while texting uses just the texting service. 

The answer is so simple it may shock you. Turn off iMessage then everything goes on the texting service. It fools you because if you turn off FaceTime it is off. iMessage off just sends everything on the texting service instead of using Data service.

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WiFi Router

How to Access Your Router Step by Step

1. Verify the local address of your router. Home routers are manufactured to use a default address such as 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1, or 192.168.2.1. If unsure of your router’s default IP address, or if you have changed the default previously, follow these instructions: How To Find a Router’s IP Address

2. Verify your computer is connected to the router either via an Ethernet cable or wireless. In either case, ensure your computer possesses a valid IP address.

3. Open a Web browser window and request a connection to the router using its local IP address. For example, type http://192.168.1.1/ in the browser’s address bar to request a connection to a router using the IP address 192.168.1.1.

4. If the browser request is successful, you will be connected to the router and prompted for the administrative login (username and password) information. Enter the administrative login information to authenticate yourself to use the router’s admin screens. Broadband routers contain default usernames and passwords when first installed. Consult your router’s documentation if you need to know the default login information.
Fix Errors

1. If the browser request returns an error message, your computer is likely not connected to the router. You may need to perform additional troubleshooting to establish a connection. Try the following procedures and repeat step 3 above as needed to resolve any connection problems:

* reboot (power off and on) your router

* temporarily disable your network firewall

* reset your router to factory defaults (consult the manufacturer’s documentation)

Router Access and Wi-Fi

If this is the first time you are connecting to a wireless router for administrative work, consider using a wired Ethernet link rather than a Wi-Fi link. Your Ethernet connection to the router will keep working even if you haven’t finished configuring or accidentally break its Wi-Fi settings.

When connecting to a router via Wi-Fi, keep the computer close to the router – in the same room if necessary – to avoid connection drops due to interference or weak wireless signals. Ensure the Wi-Fi security settings of the computer match those on the router, as mismatches prevent success connections. For more, see –  Reasons Why Wi-Fi Connections Drop.

Send text (SMS) via eMail 

How to Send a Text Message (SMS) Via Email:To send a text message via email, you must use a SMS to email gateway. Just substitute a 10-digit cell number for ‘number’ for each carrier below:

* AT&T: number@txt.att.net

* T-Mobile: number@tmomail.net

* Verizon: number@vtext.com

* Sprint: number@messaging.sprintpcs.com or number@pm.sprint.com

* Virgin Mobile: number@vmobl.com

* Tracfone: number@mmst5.tracfone.com

* Metro PCS: number@mymetropcs.com

* Boost Mobile: number@myboostmobile.com

* Cricket: number@sms.mycricket.com

* Ptel: number@ptel.com

* Republic Wireless: number@text.republicwireless.com

* Suncom: number@tms.suncom.com

* Ting: number@message.ting.com

* U.S. Cellular: number@email.uscc.net

* Consumer Cellular: number@cingularme.com

* C-Spire: number@cspire1.com

* Page Plus: number@vtext.comp